Fri, 31/03/2017
Photograph: Mark Douet

Lindsey Ferrentino has had a busy few years, and the future appears to be even more jam packed for this 28 year old Florida native. Her breakout play, “Ugly Lies The Bone”, currently running in the Lyttelton, at the National Theatre, has had a lengthy journey prior to crossing the Atlantic for its British premiere. 

“It wasn't the first play that I'd written, but it was the first that had gotten attention. Over the past three years it has gone through our countries play development process which is much more extensive than you have here. It's one of the big…

Fri, 17/03/2017

Sandwiched in the middle of the 90s season at Styx is the Anthony Neilson’s 1991 play, a horrifying tale based on the Düsseldorf Ripper Peter Kurten’s crimes in the late 1920s. In Emma Baggott’s minimalist production, Grace Smart’s functional set serves as the perfect landscape in which the audience can sit, jury-like, focusing on both Neilson’s provocative dialogue and the emerging psychological battle between the central characters. 

Whilst Neilson’s work is known for its controversial content, his construction of language; its rhythm, pace and conflict, give productions the…

Fri, 10/03/2017
Photograph: Tristram Kenton

As a teenager obsessed with musical theatre at the time ‘Rent’ was running at the Shaftesbury Theatre in 1998, I arrived at the New Victoria Theatre with a certain amount of trepidation. Jonathan Larson’s score was groundbreaking in the mid-90s, and for various reasons, every production I've seen since has left me bereft of the exhilaration and soul of the original. Not so with Bruce Guthrie’s revival, which oozes heart and energy from every pore whilst embracing the passion of New York’s East Village community in a time when they needed it most. Whilst the…

Sun, 05/03/2017

'Blasted’ Sarah Kane’s first play ‘about love and violence and rape and war’ very much suits the raw, concreted naked space at Styx. First performed in 1995 at the Royal Court Theatre, the piece should in theory, still have a strong contemporary resonance over 20 years later. Sadly we are still living in a world where certain countries are living in fear, in an environment rife with the violence of war. We are still living in a world where politics and religion are often used as an ‘excuse’ for the chaos, rather than devices that might help society reach for a hopeful future. Unfortunately…

Mon, 20/02/2017
From l to r: Rebecca Gwyther, Naomi Westerman, Eleanor Crosswell

Sitting down to talk about “Claustrophilia”, described by its producer as “A one woman dark comedy about a kidnap victim”, it's easy to see why the all female team of playwright Naomi Westerman, director/ producer Rebecca Gwyther and actor Eleanor Crosswell are so excited about bringing their now full length version of Westerman’s play to the Vaults, beneath Waterloo Station. Gwyther and Crosswell reflect, “We decided that we wanted to take it further but we weren't quite sure how, then Vaults came up and we thought it would…

Thu, 19/01/2017
Photograph: Mat Ricardo

It’s mid-morning and having inhaled a bowl of Shreddies, Stuart Goldsmith is ready to talk about his route into comedy, his shows and his role as host of ‘The Comedian’s Comedian Podcast’; an insightful glimpse into the careers and processes of some of the world’s industry greats.  Presenting his first solo show at the Edinburgh Fringe in 2010, Stu was not thrust into the public eye through numerous TV appearances, and on reflection he thinks perhaps there ought to have been someone there dragging the right people to see his show as it might have launched his…

Mon, 09/01/2017
Photograph: Tristram Kenton

Based on the 2003 film of the same title starring Jack Black, School of Rock tells the story of wannabe rock star Dewey Finn who, in a desperate attempt to make rent, poses as his flatmate Ned Shneebly, taking a supply teaching position at a prestigious private school. It's an uplifting tale showing the journey of a man-child reluctantly embracing adulthood and responsibility, whilst enabling a group of children to believe in their dreams. A class of wildly intelligent academic children form a rock band and begin a great adventure, and in the process both Finn…

Sat, 07/01/2017

Leaving the Playhouse at the conclusion of ‘An Inspector Calls’, I knew my thoughts wouldn't take the form of a conventional review so to speak. Most critics since the original Daldry production in 1992, have hailed it as an example of a production that changed the way directors interpret classic works, which is completely true; in fact the opening moments rated among the most impressive, evocative sequences I've ever seen in a theatre. There's nothing dated about it, unlike the feeling I got seeing ‘Phantom of the Opera’ not that long ago. However, in deciding not to revise the plot from…

Wed, 07/12/2016

Armed with wristband, a small group of people are ushered into the world of the roaring 20s; the private office of Detective Peel. The set is a perfect combination of theatrical detail and functional bar. Immediately drawn into the world of the story, we are given some context of what the evening has in store for us, where we are going, the events taking place there and the characters we will meet. From there on we are sent through to a secret, stylish prohibition era bar, and it appears to be up to us, which is the key to any immersive performance. The more inquisitive attitude…

Mon, 31/10/2016
Photograph: Luisa Guerreiro

In March 2017 Old Lamp Entertainment will premiere H.G. Wells’ ‘The Crystal Egg’ as an exciting cinematic and sensory production. In a current scene filled with immersive theatre and interactive experiences, co-producers Mike Archer and Luisa Guerreiro are aiming to push the boundaries of live performance through a fusion of multimedia forms. Guerreiro explains the desire to ensure the audience are “absorbed into the world. You'll be sitting as you would in a cinema, and completely immersed sensorially in the world of the story via multimedia. We are exploring…